How to choose the perfect colours for your brand (Part 1)

How to choose the perfect colours for your brand

the perfect colour

 

I’ve loved colour forever. I used to spend hours dressing up my barbie dolls in fabulous costumes imagined out of scraps from my mother’s sewing. I wouldn’t make up stories for the dolls; of them going shopping, or being school teachers, or of being whisked away to a fabulous ball by a handsome stranger. No; I would simply sit there and try pattern against pattern, colour against colour. For hours.

Which all just goes to give you an idea of how crippled I was when I was trying to choose colours for my site. OMG, what the hell do I choose? I love …. everything….  .

More on me later.

 

You know, colour is just about THE biggest identifying feature people see when they first look at something, and can be a major consideration when they purchase something (acid green two piece suit, anyone?). And although I’m not suggesting that people won’t visit your site/read your blog because it’s not their favourite shade of blue, it’s still a pretty important factor in conveying the right mood – one that is not only expressive of your brand’s values and attitudes, but more importantly, one that’s in line with your audience’s expectations.

 

The Meanings of Colours

Now before I go too much further, I want to talk a bit about the meanings of colours. I would like to emphasise that colours have a wide range of meanings which vary from culture to culture and also with context, so don’t get bogged down in them. For instance, in Western cultures, red sometimes means danger, but in other contexts it is associated with Christmas. In China, it often symbolises good fortune and happiness, while in other cultures red is the symbol of mourning.

Here’s some very broad generalisations that may be used when it comes to branding (but don’t take them as gospel).

Blues and darker colours are often perceived at trustworthy and solid (think banks).

Blues and greens are seen as calming, especially pastel hues of mint and aqua.

Greens and browns are seen as earthy and natural.

Red especially, but also orange and yellow are often thought of as active colours.

Tertiary colours such as magenta (red-violet) and lime (yellow-green) are usually thought of as more youthful, fun colours.

I’ll stop there, because as I said these are broad generalisations, and in each case it also depends on how vivid the colour is, how light or dark it is, and what other colours it’s used with. (I’ll go over a bit of colour-combining basics for websites in the next post too.)

 

Stop crippling yourself and start choosing

How do YOU feel about colour? Same as me – like you’re stuck when it comes to choosing colours for your brand, because everything looks wonderful? Or, you find a great palette and love the colours, but it’s just not pinpointing the mood you’re looking for? Or, maybe you think you have very little confidence with colour, and just feel plain scared?

You know, it really doesn’t matter why you have difficulties choosing colour – the end result is the same; and that is that you can’t settle on anything. Fortunately, there’s a solution (or even two or three).

 

Work with your business personality

It helps if you have a clear vision of the mood/personality of your brand (so you know what mood you’re going to project). If you don’t, than have a stab at this – write a list of half a dozen words or more personality traits that you would like your brand to express. (Better still, read this article in order to get a grip on your business personality.) You can start with masculine or feminine, young or mature, then get a bit more specific with descriptors such as dreamy, modern, dramatic, or sentimental.

Next, keep those words in mind and go searching through places like ColourLovers.com or Design Seeds, and try and match your mood words to the colour palette you’ve chosen. These places have thousands of pre-made palettes that you can use for anything you want. Each palette lists the hex codes for each colour, so you can recreate them for yourself.

I especially like the Design Seeds palettes – although Jessica tends to create palettes based around gentle images of flowers, nature, and weathered textures, she has a great eye for extracting the colour essence out of a picture. (Each image is linked to the original post if you’d like to find out colour codes).

 

design seeds - flora hues

design seeds – flora hues

 

design seeds - color heaven

design seeds – color heaven

 

design seeds - color set

design seeds – color set

 

I know not everyone is as skilled as Jessica! Don’t fret – there are other ways you can find your own palette too; I’ll get to them in the next post.

So for now, I want you to go exploring. If you’ve found a palette you LOVE and want to show it off, leave a link in the comments. If you’d like suggestions for your website/blog/shop, leave a link and we can all have a look and make suggestions!

Oh, and my blog’s palette? Yes, this blog’s been through a few renovations and reincarnations. Fortunately, I’ve finally settled on something. Hells, it’s a rainbow of sorts – I just can’t help myself.

 

tractorgirl proportional palette

 

J x

 

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{edit: You can read Part 2 on choosing the perfect colours here.}

My wrap-up of the 2015 Artful Business Conference

Artful Business Conference
2015 artful business conference

All of us at ArtfulBizCon 2015!! (photo from Matt Clark Photo)

 

OH. MY. Seriously my head is still spinning from this wonderful, amazing, warm-hearted, beautiful, sharing conference. It was inspiring, it was practical.  It was mind-bending and down-to-earth.

I think it was even life-changing (but I’ll let you know for sure in a year or so).

Karen Gunton (The Lighthouse Revolution) spoke about the need to resonate with what you do. Make it a mission. Call it a revolution. Your purpose is a crusade, an evolution, a voyage, a legacy. To not feel like you have to change the world, but to know you can change the world for one person. To ask yourself, “Who am I NOT to share my passion, my why, what I have to offer?” I felt sure she said that just for me.

Lynda Rennick (Homelea Lass) spoke on living with chronic illness. About life teaching you what you need to know – and being open enough that you listen to its lessons. To live your life with gratitude, to go gently, and to create daily. To write yourself a love letter. About becoming more self-aware, and realising that when you fall into a rut and old habits, you can get yourself out again.

Kym Seletto (the original Rad Bitch) spoke about her journey from being an art school drop-out dealing with anxiety and depression, to realising that self-care is an enormously important thing and being a life coach, teaching others to put themselves front and centre. How to set boundaries in your life and stick to them so that you don’t get burnt out.
And she was fun. She made us all eat frogs. Truly.

Sonia Lyne (Dandelyne Embroidery) talked about her journey from making tiny embroideries to sell, to making kits that are selling worldwide. About her business ups and downs – being confronted by ‘haters’, being told she was ‘lucky’ (it’s hard work), dealing with copiers, dealing with stress. About listening to  what the customers are asking about and using that to change and grow her business. About using your problems to become your solutions. And SHARING. Always sharing. About the need to make yourself happy. About struggling with growing up in a family that always reinforced the idea to “Do things that make other people happy”. But realising that when we do things that make US happy, the happiness flows out of us to others anyway.

Nicky McKay, a web designer and branding expert, brought home the idea of how vitally important it is to brand properly, by telling us the story of her search for the perfect wedding dress. And how the reality of a messy, crowded shop not matching with their slick website left a bad taste in her mouth. And how messy websites made her simply click away. Whatever you do in your brand, be authentic; be consistent.

Sylvia Chierchia (Beautiful Money) got down and dirty with the practicalities of dealing with money. How to get clear on your financial situation, how to sort out your money purpose, what systems to have in place, and to always work with a mindset of abundance, because this is such a powerful thing.

Tash Corbin spoke on the New Feminine Dynamic of Business.  It’s all about connection – discussions, groups, support, showing your vulnerability, responding, inviting questions, caring, and knowing people. Women are so very good at connecting; we can use these skills to get to know our customers better. That’s great for the bottom line.

 

And Elle? Elle Roberts is the bee’s knees.

 

So yes, I laughed and I cried. I had tears (of overwhelm, in a good way!). I spoke to (and hugged) all of the speakers. I spoke to nearly everyone in the room, and ate the incredibly delicious food. I met heaps of my online friends, and make some new connections. I learnt a LOT about myself.

It was terrific. I’ve already booked my ticket for 2016 (you can too, I’d LOVE to see you there! Here {and yes that’s an affiliate link but if you book through me you get bonuses including 1hr 1:1 brand coaching with me!! Get in touch for full deets. Also, early bird saving $90 runs out on 29th Feb, 2016}).

And you can STILL get a recording of this year’s event too – a Silver Pass gets you LiveStream Access and a USB recording of all the speakers and all the workshops! Get it here.

 

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If you were at the conference, either virtual or in the room with me, leave me a comment telling what was YOUR biggest takeaway. If you weren’t, let me know why you’d like to go, and what/who you’d like to see!

Big love always, Julie X

Looking for your ideal customer? Here’s where to find them

looking for your ideal customer

 

OK, so you’ve got a fabulous product that you’re head and heels totally in love with and you can’t stop talking about it.

But you know, there’s one thing missing. HAVE YOU EVEN CONSIDERED YOUR CUSTOMER?

When you aim for everything you hit nothing, so they say. If you try to appeal to everyone, then you’re appealing to no one.

The only real way to have a product that sells is for it to solve a problem for your customer, fill a need, or make them feel great about themselves. (And you can figure out who they are here.) Ask yourself what does your product or service help them with (for instance, if you’re a fine art photographer, your product helps them with their interior design; or if you sell baby clothes, you make them feel great by having a well-dressed baby). You absolutely need to get inside your potential customer’s head and figure out what it is that they’re wanting. And to do this, you need to be as specific as possible about who they are. (Yes, there is definitely trial and error and a certain amount of guesswork in this. But the more you do business with them, the more you’ll find out about them, so just keep going.) And when you know who they are and what they want, you can start to speak their language, and ask them the questions they’re asking themselves.

Because when you speak the same language, when you have the same world view as them, you automatically make an emotional connection and that’s the key to turning them into paying customers. You’ve built up rapport and trust. And when you deliver what they want, they’re so thrilled with what you do that they not only become return customers, but they spread the word about how fantastic you are. 

Ba-BAM! Business explosion! Right?

Hmmm yes well it’s all very good in theory, but WHERE IN THE HELL DO YOU FIND THOSE DAMN CUSTOMERS? You can have THE best product in the world – one that’s going to end global poverty, keep the oceans free from waste, and make small children excited about keeping their rooms tidy – but if nobody knows about it, what’s the point?

You need to get out there and find those customers.

SO here are my top seven tips for searching out and connecting with your tribe.

  1. Facebook groups – Listen, as much as you hear all the time that FB “isn’t worth the effort” because they limit and fuss around with what everybody gets to see in their feed, I absolutely believe that it’s still worth getting in there and using it – for all sorts of different reasons. If you’ve got a Facebook page for your business, use it!How FB decides what goes into people’s feeds is based on a number of factors, pretty much centred around how active the group/page is.  So if you’re in there posting every day, AND your people are commenting and liking on your posts, then your posts will be shown to more and more people. The trick is to make your posts engaging for your people – ask them about themselves (because people love talking about themselves); ask provocative questions (only if they’re relevant); entertain them with a (relevant) beautiful or amusing image.The bonus is that by asking questions, you find out heaps more about the folk who DO like your page! Use that knowledge to fine-tune your ideal customer profile.”But I only have a tiny FB following” you moan! Well I say, have you invited all of your FB friends to like your page? Your family? Asked your close friends if they mind sharing your page with their friends? Posted links to your FB page on your website? On other social media? Round ’em up, get them engaged, post shareable content, and you are well on your way to growing your following.

    JOIN OTHER FB GROUPS. Have you engaged in other groups to let them know who you are and what you’re doing? It doesn’t have to be all icky push and salesy (and it’s better if you aren’t) – many business groups have set days where you encouraged to share what you do and what you’re offering (for instance #PromoThursday), and sometimes people straight-out ask for particular services in these groups too – so make sure you’re around and can put your hand up! Search some hashtags to find relevant conversations about what you’re doing – this will not only allow you to see what people are asking for in your niche (so you can help tailor your services), but you can also find other groups to join. Win-win!

  2. Twitter and Instagram. Use the same strategy with your other social media –  Follow others AND ENGAGE WITH THEM, offer up good content, and use the hashtags – they’re a great search tool for finding other conversations that are happening in your niche.
  3. Pinterest – is not really ‘social’ media in the same sense that the other three biggies are. If you use it, think about how often you actually engage with the people you follow – hardly ever, right? It’s primarily a search tool for finding stuff you’re interested in (especially pretty stuff). BUT, it’s still a rich source of information about your potential customers – use the search tool to see what others are pinning, and particularly what has been pinned from your website – this will give you the best ideas about what your customers actually DO love the most (so you can keep doing more of it. You can find yourself by using www.pinterest.com/source/yourwebsite.com – and seeing what pops up.
  4. Use search engines. Google your business’s keywords and see what other conversations you can find from potential customers. You might find a great forum, or another fantastic website with a heap of interesting comments. Depending on what you find, you can join in the discussion and help out with excellent advice – people will love you for it.
  5. Guest blog about your area of expertise on a site you admire. Reach for the stars – go the Huffington Post if you dare!  If you’re not quite there yet, simply look around at the sites that you love reading and approach them for guest posting opportunities. Some don’t accept guest posts and that’s OK, but many do. Once you’ve found a site you’d like to try, make sure you do 5 minutes research and find out the name of the person you need to be writing to. I DON’T open emails that start with “Hello blogowner”, and rarely open ones that start with “Hi there”. But if it’s got “Hi Julie”, I’ll read it.Keep your proposal short and sweet – start with why you love their blog, what area of expertise you have, and a couple of suggestions for topics that are closely aligned with THEIR audience.  You might like to include a couple of links to your best articles. Be beautiful, be polite and say thank you for their time, and that you look forward to hearing from them. And follow up – if you don’t hear back from them in a week or two, contact them again with a short, polite reminder, because hey, sometimes things get put aside and forgotten! We’re all human.
  6. Reach out to other people in your niche for a collaboration. Find others with complementary skills/products – what can you do to collaborate? How can you benefit both audiences with a super valuable offer? Join forces, brainstorm, get it out there and you’ve doubled your audience! Magic.
  7. Start up a mailing list. Probably THE best strategy ever for connecting with your customers. You know that if they sign up to your list, they’re already interested in what you do. So make sure you have plenty of opportunities for them to do so – on your website sidebar, on your “About” page, and on your “Contact” page.And reward them for it. Most people don’t bother signing up to a list that merely promises “regular updates” (unless of course you’re Seth Godin). If you’re selling products, you could offer to put them in a draw for a prize each month, or you could write a short e-book on your area of expertise. If you’re a jeweller for instance you could offer your best tips and tricks on looking after jewellery, and/or how to look after it while travelling. If you’re a portrait photographer, you could offer a round-up of your best tips on how to prepare for a shoot – what to wear, makeup, choosing a location, how lighting can effect the mood of your shoot, etc. If you’re a service provider, it’s a simple matter of offering an intro or brief version of one of your paid courses.

 

So that’s it! There are LOTS of different ways of searching out and connecting with those beautiful customers; you’ve just got to put in the time.

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BACK TO YOU! Have you found some innovative ways to connect with your customers? What’s your best customer-connection story? I’d love to hear! Pop a comment in the box below, share your biz name and how you’ve connected, and you never know – you might just connect with some other great people here too!

Julie x

What does an artist need to be successful?

What makes one artist succeed over another when they both do good work? It’s a great question!
Guest post by Deborah Blakeley

After having interviewed over 170 artists and artisans from around the world you would think I should have the answer to this question. There are similarities, and there are many and varied reasons for them to be successful.

There is one thing that does flow through all the artists. They are passionate about their work and they all know it is as important to them as breathing. They want to create.

Let me take three examples.

Peter Clark from London works with paper. He collects paper. But he looks beyond the actual paper, and it is through this he is able to take sheet music and create ballet dresses. Or maps and make them into cowboy pants. The paper is there but it is Peter who breathes life into each work.

Peter was unfortunate to have a stroke and it was his need to create that made him battle beyond the physio’s exercises to take up his scissors. He said that cutting and the need to cut gave him back the strength he needed for his art.

 

peter clark - paper sulpture

peter clark – paper sulpture

 

 

Even the very BIG names need motivation and encouragement, like Peter Randall-Page who has been working for over 30 years producing sculptures that are around the world. When I asked him about the Tate Modern acquiring his sculpture Where the Bee Sucks 1991, Peter Randall- Page told the truth; but the truth is humbling. “Honestly, I am still delighted every time a work of mine enters a public collection, but without question the biggest boost was when the Tate bought Where the Bee Sucks. No artist should forget that they need encouragement. This also applies in giving encouragement. Tell others that you enjoy their work if you are able to buy their work.”

 

 

“There is no better way to give an artist encouragement than to see a simple red dot against their art.”

 

 

Peter Randall-Page - 'Where the Bee Sucks' - limestone

Peter Randall-Page – ‘Where the Bee Sucks’ – limestone

 

 

A final example is Velda Newman who said that she had taken loads of classes in colour, design and composition to find confidence in herself.  Originally a painter, Velda Newman applied her skills and knowledge to textiles. Rather than make quilts similar to others she needed that something ‘special’.  “I knew I had to do something to make my quilts stand out from the rest. That’s when I started making large scale quilts. My second quilt won Best of Show at Houston, TX and I have never looked back.”

Artists know when their work is good. Like Velda Newman they need to find that niche where they can stand out, be different so be noticed. Not try to do what someone else is doing or rather has done. Find your niche and go for it.

 

velda newman - zinnia quilt - 8ft x 18ft, paint and ink on cotton sateen

velda newman – zinnia quilt – 8ft x 18ft, paint and ink on cotton sateen

 

Velda Newman with her work

Velda Newman with her work

 

 

 

Every artist that I have interviewed and will interview has had to decide on the medium that they will work in and master. They have had to leave many other ideas behind and concentrate on the aspect that they love doing and will want to get out of bed each day to do. They have honed their craft and developed the skills and added their very own personality. This leads to invitations, and exhibitions and recognition they have worked very hard and kept within the parameters. They are experts and they want to share their passion with the world.

 

My personal passion has been to ask all those thousands of questions and build up a site {ZoneOneArts} that has so many different and varied artists who have wanted to share their work with a broader audience. Look at their work, look at your work and develop your own niche. It will lead to success but it will require bucket loads of hard work. Don’t dwell on your mistakes, be like Peter Clark and pick up the scissors and give yourself the strength and determination needed. Good luck!

Deborah Blakeley

 

Who is your ideal customer? How to figure them out with mood boards

who is your ideal customer

 

Who IS your ideal customer, and why do you need to know?

Because if you’re trying to appeal to everyone, then in reality, you’re actually appealing to no one. You’re boring.

“Next…”

And because if your website conveys a vibrant, fun and youthful business personality, then that’s no good if your ideal customer is the mature, conservative bank manager type (OK maybe I’m being a bit mean to bank managers… I’m sure some of them dye their hair purple and listen to experimental electronica).

The point is, it’s vitally important to know who you’re selling to so you can gear the mood of your business personality towards them.

One method of getting to grips with your customer is to use a mood board (have you used one for your business personality as well? You should – just keep these boards separate – you’ll see why in a minute).

Now, I know there are lots of people who have a bit of a haphazard attempt at putting together a mood board for their biz via Pinterest and the like. However, it’s not just “whatever you like” – it needs to be more strategic and there is definitely a method to using mood boards in order to extract the information you need. That’s because you’re coming at it from two points of view – what you want your business to look like, and who your IDEAL CUSTOMER is. It’s like those Venn diagrams you learnt about in high school (you know, the ones where two circles overlap) – the area in which these two groups of things overlap is the sweet spot you should be aiming for. If you’ve got the right business for YOU, those two circles should have a pretty big overlap.

It’s most important to focus on your ideal customer, and what you want your business to look like will grow fairly naturally out of that – because you’re picking the pictures, right!? My best tip is to do this via Pinterest, because it’s so easy to find pics that suit. Better still, when you’re using Pinterest you can research things that are harder to investigate from the comfort of your own armchair (unless you’re a complete magazine/TV junkie…).

If you know exactly who your ideal customer is that’s great, but if you’re a bit fuzzy on them, that’s OK; you will probably know a little bit about them anyway.

Get a sheet of paper, and title it “My ideal customer”. Start with the basic demographics – stuff like gender, marital status and family situation, income level, education, and culture/race (if it’s important – for some products it can be).

Next, it’s time for a bit of educated guesswork about some other aspects of your customer’s likes and dislikes, and so you need to get into their head a bit more. Really, take a guess – because as we said at the start you need to appeal to someone. And as your business grows and you get to see more of your customers, then the more you will refine your ideal customer and figure out how to appeal to them. So have a think about these questions, and write down your answers.

1. What are their goals and aspirations?

2. What do they read? Magazines? Blogs? Books? You can list broad genres, but also get specific and list titles.

3. Where do they hang out – in real life, and online? There are some great infographics out there that match demographics to the different types of social media they use – for instance Facebook users tend to be a bit older because they like the chat as well as the pictures, Instagram tends to be a younger crowd; it’s more visual and faster.

4. What’s an average day like for them?

5. (And this comes back to the all-important connection between your product and your ideal customer!) What problem do they have that your product solves, and what do they hope to experience when they use your product?

 

OK! Still will me? Good.

 

Get on over to Pinterest.

Ask yourself, what magazines does your “IDEAL CUSTOMER” like to read? Are they likely to read Better Homes and Gardens? Or Frankie? Or the Renegade Collective? Or Country Living? Concentrating on these style magazines is great, because each of them has a very distinct aesthetic and focus, and you can get a very strong vision of what kind of lifestyle your customer is aspiring too and what they like to surround themselves with. You can soon figure out whether they are likely to live in an apartment in the city, or a comfy family home in the suburbs.

In Pinterest, search your magazine title, and pin a bunch of images from what comes up. Pin lots. What interior decoration images are there? What colours come up – are they muted and soft, or lots of neutrals with pops of bright colour? How does the style make you feel? For instance, Better Homes and Gardens is very comfy and family home oriented, while Frankie is younger and a retro feel with lots of ditsy floral prints in soft colours.

Work your way through the images you’ve chosen and try and pick out the common things you see – colours, patterns, textures, and how those images make you feel – heroic? glamorous? cosy?

Now go back to your “Ideal Customer” page, and go through those answers again. Is there anything that doesn’t fit? Cross it out. Is there anything you’ve missed? Add it in. Is there some new insight into their aspirations? Write some more.

Write it down. It’s your reference sheet, for whenever you come up with a new product idea, or a new marketing idea, or someone approaches you for a collaboration, or…    Then ask your ideal customer if it’s something they’d be interested in. If not, put the idea aside and move onto something that will be more to their liking.

And yay, look at those Pinterest boards again and you’ve got some great colour palettes to work with for your own branding as well!

 

I pinned a bunch of stuff from BHG - look at those colours!

I pinned a bunch of stuff from BHG – look at those colours 🙂

 

A last word from the wonderfully astute Tara Gentile.

People don’t buy because what you do is awesome. People buy because it makes them feel awesome. - Tara Gentile Click To Tweet

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Got any questions about your ideal customer?  If you do, pop your questions in the comments below. Do it! You never know who else might be wondering exactly the same thing but be too shy to ask.

Let’s help each other!

Julie x

(p.s. the launch of The Clarity Sessions – One on One Brand Coaching is only TWO DAYS AWAY! Get in on the ground floor and get a huge early bird discount on this service, by jumping on the mailing list below! {And there’s a free consultation as well} )

 

2015 Artful Business Conference – here’s why you should go

The 2015 Artful Business Conference… I am beyond excited to be able to attend this event IN PERSON this year (you can read what I had to say about last year’s conference here). YAY me!
(Not to mention being able to visit galleries in the big smoke and catch up with some of my besties 😀 )

Why do I want to go so much? (Hint: if you clicked on the link above you’d know why, but if you just want the quick answer, read on.)

Because it’s fabulous.

Last two years I’ve attended, I have learnt SO much about running a profitable small business for heart-centred creatives. People like you and me, who totally love what they do and want to share that passion with the world.

I’ve learnt to focus on my WHY. I’ve learnt about how I can best help people with the work I do. I’ve learnt about how to get my message across more effectively. I’ve learnt how to adapt to change and grow my brand. I’ve learnt that we all tell ourselves stories about who and what we are, and what we deserve – and because of those stories, we limit and sabotage ourselves in our efforts to get ahead (ooh, I feel I’m still on the first chapter of this one! But I firmly believe that understanding the problem is the key to moving beyond it).

I’ve learnt a bunch of practical things too. How to run a successful social media campaign. How to charge properly for your time, and what that means for your business’s bottom line (seriously, we really don’t value our time enough). Getting rigorous about finding your customers. How to use your email list effectively. (You have one don’t you? Of course you do. And you must be constantly growing it. Yes you do.)

 

SO. MUCH. GOOD.

 

So what’s on this year?

More fabulousness of course.

* Business mentors. To point you in the right direction and help you figure out what you should be focusing on. (Read Tash Corbin’s story here, Kym Seletto’s here, and Artful Business Conference founder, Elle Roberts here).

* Financial mentors, helping you figure out your financial potential, and HOW TO GET IT (Sylvia Chierchia is here).

* Web designers, for building a powerful online presence (Nicki McKay is here).

* Creative business owners that have built their biz from the ground up. They know exactly what it’s like to build a business around something that you love (Lynda Rennick is here, and Sonia Lyne (who I haven’t seen in a squillion years since uni, squeeee!) is here).

And last but not least,
Revolutionaries and lighthouse builders. I cannot say enough about this wonderful person. Karen Gunton is quite simply, awesome.

 

 

2015 artfulbizcon 2015 artfulbizcon2

 

So I’ll see you there, yeah?

 

BUY IT NOW

 

Now, I’m an affiliate of this fab event, so that I get a small percentage from every sale – but I would never promote anything I don’t wholeheartedly believe in.

And I really, really, REALLY believe that this event has the power to totally transform your business. So I’m giving you bonus extras! For everyone who signs up through my link, you get a free Brand Clarity coaching session with me – that’s a 1 x hour Skype session and a written report on your biz, valued at $165.

The Artful Business Conference is available online too, so if you can’t be there in person, you can still ‘be there’ and join in! In fact there are a wide range of participation options, so you can find the format that suits you best. Prices range from a Virtual Pass at $97 to a Backstage Pass with ALL the extras at $797.
(So really, even if you spend just $97 bucks, you get $247 value! So what are you waiting for?)

 

BUY IT NOW

 

I can’t wait.

Julie X